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The Moon Is Flipped Upside Down in the Southern Hemisphere

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How old were you when you learned that the Moon in the Southern Hemisphere is upside down? I was today years old…this is my head exploding —> %@*&!$. Ok, the Moon isn’t upside down (that’s Northern-ist) but its orientation changes depending on if you’re north or south of the equator.

Moon Flipped

“From our perspective, the Moon and the night sky is actually rotated 180 degrees compared to our Northern Hemispherical friends,” Jake Clark, an astronomer from the University of Southern Queensland in Australia, explained to ScienceAlert.

“In the south we see the Moon’s dark ‘Oceanus Procellarum’ sea in the south-east corner compared to in the north-west corner for a northern observer.”

But why does it look like this? Well, because physically, we’re actually upside down compared to someone standing in the opposite hemisphere.

That makes perfect sense & the explanation is quite simple but it’s still messing with my head. How did I not know this? Here’s how the Moon appears in the Northern Hemisphere (from Wikipedia):

Moon Flipped North

And here’s a photo from Brendan Keene in Australia:

Moon Flipped South

Tags: Earth   Moon   space
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popular
22 days ago
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josephwdunn
22 days ago
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7 public comments
llucax
21 days ago
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And how does it looks from the equator? Why people is always discriminating Ecuadorians?
Berlin
StunGod
20 days ago
I think that as you get closer to the equator, the moon takes a more elevated path across the sky. The farther north or south you travel, the lower in the sky the Moon is, since it orbits over the equator. I'm at about 45 degrees north, so there's always a "top" and "bottom" to the moon because it never goes right overhead. It moves sideways in an arc in the southern sky. At the equator, it still moves sideways, but goes directly overhead so there's no strong visual indication of what pole is top or bottom.
roblatham
21 days ago
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How have I never considered this before?
dukeofwulf
22 days ago
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Explain that, Flat Earthers.
mareino
22 days ago
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HOW FAST DO I HAVE TO FLY TO SEE IT FLIP
Washington, District of Columbia
StunGod
22 days ago
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Yep, I'm in this camp too. Today years old, just learning this incredibly obvious thing.
Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth
iwhitney
24 days ago
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What? I was In Australia and I did not know this.
Minneapolis, MN
deezil
24 days ago
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I TOO WAS TODAY YEARS OLD.
Louisville, Kentucky

Manually pixelated food

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Yuni Yoshida

Yuni Yoshida

Art director Yuni Yoshida has created these pixelated food photos by manually cutting up the foods in question into little cubes. Love these.

See also censored fruit.

Tags: food   Yuni Yoshida
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josephwdunn
155 days ago
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Behind-the-scenes look at mixing the clay for Wallace and Gromit

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When producing their claymation-style feature films or Wallace and Gromit & Shaun the Sheep animations, Aardman Animations goes through 100s of pounds of modeling clay. As Adam Savage learned on a recent visit to Aardman, bulk clay from the factory is run through several processes to ensure that Gromit’s fur is the same shade in frame #6800 as it was in frame #1 and that the consistency is appropriate for the modelers.

See also the mesmerizing paint mixing videos on Instagram and YouTube.

Tags: Aardman Animations   Adam Savage   video
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josephwdunn
280 days ago
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“My mission is to set an example that no one can follow.” Pippa...

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“My mission is to set an example that no one can follow.”
Pippa Garner

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josephwdunn
287 days ago
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Coffee Lids: Peel, Pinch, Pucker, Puncture

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Coffee Lids

Coffee Lids

You’d think it’d be simple enough: make a disposable lid for a takeout coffee cup. You should be able to drink the coffee without removing the lid and the lid should stay on if the cup tips over (most of the time). But this simple design challenge has been solved in many different ways, as evidenced in Louise Harpman’s and Scott Specht’s forthcoming book, Coffee Lids: Peel, Pinch, Pucker, Puncture.

The book is a partial catalogue of the authors’ extensive collection of coffee lids. Photos of the lids are organized into groups based on what you do with the lid to get at that sweet sweet beverage: peel, pinch, pucker, or puncture. They explained the four types of lid in an article for Cabinet magazine in 2005.

Certain lids, such as the Solo Traveler (1986) designed by Jack Clements, require the drinker only to place his or her mouth over the protruded polystyrene proboscis. The pucker-type lid requires its user to drink through the lid, not from the cup, as is the case in the peel-type lids. The Solo Traveler is the lid that Phil Patton championed in his 1996 article in I.D. magazine and also the lid that art and design curator Paola Antonelli selected for inclusion in last year’s Museum of Modern Art exhibition, “Humble Masterpieces.” This type of lid offers a certain degree of “mouth comfort” and also has added “loft” space within the structure of the lid to accommodate beverages with frothy tops.

What a phrase: “protruded polystyrene proboscis”. Harpman also gives a short tour of the collection in this video:

Tags: books   coffee   design   Louise Harpman   Scott Specht
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josephwdunn
293 days ago
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This bridge cuts sea ice into tidy rectangles

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Bridge Ice Cutter

The 8-mile-long Confederation Bridge links Prince Edward Island with mainland Canada. In the winter, when the water in the strait freezes, the wind and tides can push the floating ice against the bridge, causing the evenly spaced piers to slice the ice into remarkably uniform rectangular chunks.

To put the rectangles into perspective, the bridge piers that are designed to break up the ice floes are 250 meters apart. That distance would also represent the width of each of the rectangles. The length of the blocks varies but, on average, the length is about 75 per cent greater than the width.

It is likely that the Confederation Bridge will have lots of slicing to do this winter. Department of Fisheries and Oceans spokesman, Steve Hachey said ice conditions started developing in the Northumberland Strait earlier than normal this year, resulting in a current thickness of up to 30 centimeters.

The bridge was specifically designed to withstand these sorts of pressures from the ice. Photo by Paul Tymstra.

Tags: architecture   photography
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josephwdunn
293 days ago
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